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Faq's

FAQ's

Q. How often do kids need to go to the dentist?

Ans: A check-up every six months is recommended in order prevent cavities and other dental problems. However, your pediatric dentist can tell you when and how often your child should visit based on their personal oral health.


Q. How often do you have to go to the dentist?

Ans: If effect, the recommendation to visit a dentist every 6 months is to catch tooth decay early before it does serious damage to the tooth. Well, gum disease is a horse of a different color. Under the right conditions, such as not taking proper care of your gums, it can develop in a week.


Q. Who can get orthodontics?

Ans: It's never too late to achieve a beautiful straight smile... Braces aren’t just for kids any more. Tooth alignment can be changed at any age if your gums and bone structure are healthy. Having orthodontic treatment can dramatically improve your appearance and self-esteem. Improving the health of your teeth and gums is equally important. Crooked teeth and a bad bite can contribute to gum and bone loss, tooth decay, abnormal wear of the tooth enamel and surfaces, headaches and jaw joint (TMJ/TMD) pain.


Q. What happens after I have my braces removed?

Ans: When we remove your braces, we will begin the retention stage of your treatment. Your final orthodontic result depends on you wearing your retainers, so follow through with the work you’ve put in so far. Remember to remove your retainer before eating, and brush your retainer before placing it back in your mouth. Alternatively, we can fit you with a permanent fixed wire retainer on the inner surfaces of your teeth.


Q. Am I a candidate for dental implants?

Ans: If you have a missing tooth or teeth, or a loose lower denture, dental implants may be right for you. But there are many aspects to consider. The health and condition of your gums and bone play a major role in the decision process. That’s because, without the healthy structure in place, the implants will not be able to thrive. If you would like to speak to one of our expert professional team about implants, just let our front desk team know. They will add in extra time for discussion at your next visit.


Q. In chair and take home bleaching kits – what is the difference?

Ans: In chair teeth whitening uses a strong active ingredient, which can only legally be prescribed and applied in the dental practice. This type of whitening can only be applied for an hour at a time and if multiple visits are required, they must be at least one week apart. While this whitening process may result in a dramatic change in brightness, it also causes more sensitivity and temporary tooth dehydration.

One visit may not be sufficient to get your teeth to the brightest shade they can be. Because this treatment is done in surgery, there is a higher cost associated with the treatment. Take home whitening is gentler, has a mild active ingredient and is safe to use without constant professional supervision. However, some professional supervision is still advised as all whitening can cause side effects like tooth sensitivity and even chemical burns.

It is important to follow instructions from your dentist, therapist and hygienist regarding the safest application of your home whitening kits. You should also check in with your NDC dental team regularly to ensure you are on track for the best results. Take home whitening is also very economical: once you have been issued your custom made home kit and starter gel, you will only need to top up your whitening once per year and the gel can be supplied at minimal cost by your National Dental Care dental practice during your preventative care visits.


Q. Why should I go to the dentist regularly?

Ans: Many people do not see a dentist on a regular basis. They only go when they have a problem. This is known as "crisis treatment" versus "preventive treatment." While these patients may feel they are saving money, it often ends up costing much more in dollars and time. This is because many dental problems do not have symptoms until they reach the advanced stages of the disease process. An example is tooth decay. It is typical to hear, "Nothing hurts... I don't have any problems."

Tooth decay often does not hurt until it gets close to the nerve of the tooth. It is not uncommon to see a patient with a huge cavity who has never felt a thing. The dentist can usually detect a cavity 3-4 years before it develops any symptoms. This early detection can help you prevent root canal treatment.


Q. What is fluoride and why is it important to dental health?

Ans: Fluoride is a mineral that occurs naturally in many foods and in water. Some natural sources of fluoride are brewed tea, canned fish, cooked kale and spinach, apples, and skim milk. Some city water contains fluoride, so by drinking tap water you will acquire fluoride. If drinking water does not have fluoride, supplements are available.

The lack of exposure to fluoride places individuals of any age at risk for dental decay. Fluoride is important to dental health because it helps prevent tooth decay by making your tooth enamel more resistant to acid attacks from plaque bacteria in your mouth. Studies have shown that children who consumed fluoridated water from birth had less dental decay. Fluoride can reverse early decay and help prevent osteoporosis, a disease that causes degenerative bone loss. Talk to your dentist or dental hygienist about whether you're getting the daily amount of fluoride you need.